Vein Treatment

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Soften and erase the appearance of veins

Spider veins are small, open blood vessels close to the skin’s surface. Usually seen on the face or legs, they enlarge with time. Broken capillaries can cause your skin to appear red and mottled. On the legs, spider veins can also be uncomfortable, causing burning or itching. In some cases, they may indicate another venous issue, such as the development of varicose veins. While visible veins are usually harmless, they can affect your self-esteem and may influence the way you dress. At Pacific Derm, we use vascular lasers to treat this common condition.

Treatment Benefits

How does laser vein treatment work?

We use the Excel V Laser, considered the gold standard in vascular lasers because of its treatment range. On top of being effective, its unique cooling technology enables higher doses with less discomfort.

As the pulses of energy move through the handpiece, you’ll feel a slight stinging sensation. Use a cold compress immediately after treatments to reduce the chance of swelling. You may see a slight reddening and/or localized swelling of the skin, which may last 24-72 hours. Avoid anything that could cause the face to flush (strenuous exercise, alcohol consumption, a hot bath) for 48 hours following each treatment.

Most patients see improvement within two to six weeks of the procedure. It usually just takes one or two sessions to give you your desired results, but the final number of laser treatments needed varies for each case depending on the colour, size and area where the veins are being treated.

Treatment areas

  • Reduce redness for smoother, more even skin

  • Reduce the appearance of veins for a more consistent skin tone

  • Reduce the appearance of veins for a more consistent skin tone

Frequently Asked Questions

Can my spider veins on my legs be treated with the laser?
Do you use a laser vein removal or injection therapy for legs?
How does the laser treatment compare to Sclerotherapy?
How does the vascular laser treat rosacea?